Tagged ‘spring’

Pies for the month of May

May 13th, 2013 by KM Wall

If the 1627  Winslows had wanted to celebrate their six years of marriage with six pies, they had some spring-time options, based on what is available in May and in New England.

Pie the first:

An herb tart

Take sorrel, spinach, parsley, and boil them in water till they be very soft as pap; then take them up, press the water clean from them, then take good store of eggs boiled very hard, and, chopping them with the herbs exceedingly small, then put in good store of currants, sugar, cinnamon, and stir all well together; then put them into a deep tart coffin with a good store of sweet butter, and cover it, and bake it like a pippin tart*, and adorn the lid after the baking in that manner also, and so serve it up.

-         Markham, Best ed. p. 109

 

Pippin Tart design from Robert May

Pippin Tart design from Robert May

And the answer is…..

July 9th, 2012 by Carolyn

 

 

Leeks!!

 

“The leaves or the blades of the Leek be long, somewhat broad, and very many, having a keel or crest in the backside, in smell and taste like to the onion. The stalks, if the blades be not often cut, do in the second or third year grow up round, bringing forth on the top flowers made up in a round head or ball as doth the Onion.”  (Gerard, John “The Herbal” 1633)

Onions and leeks look very similar when they flower. They way to tell them apart is that the leaves of the leeks are board and flat, while those of the onion are round and hollow. Here is a full length view:

 

 

Leeks were used in cookery, but beware they are very “hot” in temperature and may offset your humors as this passage warns:

 

“The Hurts

It heateth the body, ingendreth naughty bloud, causeth troublesome and terrible dreams, offendeth the eyes, dulleth the sight, hurteth those that are by nature hot and choleric, and is noysome to the stomach, and breadth windiness.” (Johnson, Thomas ed. Gerard, John “The Herbal” 1633, pg. 174-175)

 

So go ahead enjoy your leeks, but beware of impending windiness.

 

Goodwife Godbertson’s Hollyhock

July 5th, 2012 by Carolyn

Recently Cate M, one of the role-players in the 1627 English Village, made us all these great new garden reference books. From A-Z all the plants we have and their many names, uses, and sources.

 

 

New favorite reference book.

 

So today Goodwife Godbertson, aka. Kelley A, showed me her new gorgeous hollyhock plant in her garden. Which I then realized I didn’t know too much about, so I went back to our new book and learned a few things.

 

 

Hollyhock

 

“Hollihock riseth high, seedeth and dyeth; the chief use I know, is ornament.”    -Lawson,”The Country House-wife’s Garden”, 1617-


It goes by the names of hollyhock, hockes, garden mallows, and more. The most common use for it is medicinal, especially in binding and bleeding.

 

 

Hollyhock Close-up

 

And it wouldn’t be a pilgrim seasonings post without a word from Gervase Markham:

“A powder for the stone in the bladder.

For a stone in the bladder take the kernels of sloes and dry them on a tile stone, then beat them to powder, then take the roots of alexanders, parsley, pellitory, and hollyhock, of every of their roots a like quantity, and seethe them all in white wine, or else in the broth of a young chicken: then strain them into a clean vessel, and when you drink of it, put into it half a spoonful of the powder of sloe kernels. Also if you take the oil of scorpion, it is very good to anoint the member, and the tender part of the belly against the bladder.”  -  Gervase Markham, “The English Housewife”, 1615 (Do not try this remedy at home it was the 17th century, just don’t do it.)

 

So that’s a little information about hollyhocks, who knew? Can anyone guess what this plant on the right is?

 

 

Can you guess what this is?

 

 

I didn’t even know…

June 18th, 2012 by Carolyn

I’d never heard of Gooseberries until I started working at Plimoth Plantation, which horrified my co-workers, they responded like this…

 

 

and thankfully once they got over their initial shock they showed me these…

 

Gooseberries

In The Herbal, by John Gerard, in 1633, he writes:

“The ripe berries, as they are sweeter, … are very seldom eaten or used as a sauce.”

So for us this means we use them before they ripen, when they do they loose their tartness and become pink in color. He also writes:

“They are used in divers sauces for meat, as those that are skillful in cookerie can better tell than myself”

 

In translation he can’t cook, he just eats. Thankfully we have many cookery sources from the time period and are able to find gooseberries in all sorts of recipes. My favorites are hen cooked with gooseberry sauce, as well as gooseberry tart, both delicious in their own ways. Most recently we fired up the clome oven and baked ourselves a gooseberry tart using this recipe:

 

“Tartes of Gooseberries.

Lay your gooseberries in your crust, and put to them cinnamon and ginger, sugar and a few small raisins put among them and cover them with a cover.”

A Booke of Cookery with the Serving of the Table; A.W.; 1591; page 28

 

The result was this…

 

 

and a closer look…

 

 

We will all sorely miss the gooseberries once they are gone for the season, like all good things in life, like eggnog, but just like that eggnog the gooseberries will be back. And we will all be waiting…. with recipes.

Happy Birthday!

June 11th, 2012 by Carolyn

Happy Birthday to the newest addition at Plimoth Plantation. Baby Eureka was born this morning before hours

and now mom and kid are both doing very well.

 

Red Alert!

April 22nd, 2012 by Carolyn

 

As some of you may be aware Plymouth County has been on a red alert for wildfires going on at least two weeks, but luckily as of this second, we are finally getting some rain. The plants and pilgrims couldn’t be happier. I thought this would be a good time to post some pictures I’ve promised, and some great new activity going on in the village.

 

Before

 

 

 

 

 

The Alden house before it’s recent renovation; notice, no window.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After

 

 

 

Master Alden did a pretty nice job, and the house is still standing! I call that a success. When asked he said it was for more light….but we think he just wanted to bump up his real estate value with a sea-veiw window.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ready to eat asparagus in the Winslow garden this past week, Susanna Winslow said it was wonderous good.

 

 

 

A few months back we started posting about our new clome oven in the village and our multiple test bakes. After a month of once a week pilgrim use it’s looking pretty broken in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be ready for next week’s photo post including…….. corn planting, goat walking and more!

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