Tagged ‘rabbit’

Muster day Dude Food

October 27th, 2013 by KM Wall

On Friday, certain housewives were preparing….

 

1672 – John Josslyn “Cran Berry or Bear Berry…a small trayling plant that grows in Salt Marshes, that are over-grown with moss;…the Berries …red, and as big as a Cherry; some perfectly round, others Oval, all of them hollow, of a sower astringent taste; they are ripe in August and September…They are excellent against the Scurvy…They are also good to allay the fervour of hot Diseases. The Indians and English use them much, boyling them with Sugar for Sauce to eat with their Meat; and it is a delicate Sauce, especially for roasted Mutton: Some make Tarts with them as with Goose Berries. (65-6)

Therefore

A Cheerrie Tart

Take the fairest Cherries you can get, and picke them cleane from leaves and stalkes; then spread out your coffin as for your Pippin-tart, (….then having rold out the coffin flat, and raysed up a small verdge of an inch, or more high...) and cover the bottome with Suger; then couer the Suger all over with Cherries, then cover those Cherries with Sugar, some sticks of Cinamon, and here and there a Cloue; then lay in more cherries, and so more Suger, Cinnamon and cloves, till the coffin be filled vp; then couvr it, and bake it in all points as the codling and pipping tart, and so serue it; and in the same manner you may make Tarts of Gooseberries, Strawberries, Rasberries, Bilberries, or any other Berrie whatsoever.

-         Markham, Gervase. Covntrey Contentments, or The English Huswife. London. 1623. p 106.

Cranberry tart

Cranberry tart

Cranberry tart, another

Cranberry tart, another

Cranberry tart, yet another

Cranberry tart, yet another

 

 

As well as beginning the roasting part of this…..

To make Fillets Gallentine

Take faire Pork, and take off the skin and roste it half ynough, then take it off the spit, and smite it in faire peeces, and caste it in a faire pot: then cut Onions, but not too small, and frie them in faire suet, and put them into the Porke, then take the broth of Beefe or Mutton, and put therto, and set them on the fyre, and put therto powder of Pepper, Saffron, Cloves and Mace, and let them boyle wel together.  Then take faire bread and Vinigar, & steep the bread with some of the same broth, straine it, and some bloud withall, or els Saunders, and colour it with that, and let all boyle together, then cast in a litle Saffron and salte, and then may you serve it in.-

Huswifes Handmaide.  f 43

Gallentine is a sauce made from sopped bread, spices and often blood.

Suet is fat, chiefly from beef, mutton

Saffron is an expensive (still!) spice that is warming and a distinctively yellow color.

Saunders was used to make things a red color.

Or, in other words:

Fillet galletine prep - the pork butt was half roasted and the skin removed; the onions are cut and ready to go

Fillet galletine prep, day 2  – the pork butt was half roasted and the skin removed; the onions are cut and ready to go

FILLETS GALLENTINE

chine of pork pepper

bread                    clove

onions                  mace

vinegar

Roast the chine until half done. Fry onions with a little pork fat.  Chop the pork into pieces and put in a pot with onions, some ground cloves, mace, pepper and salt. Put in enough water just to cover and bring all to a boil, cooking away much of the water.  Before serving, make the gallentine by take slices of bread and soaking them in vinegar with a little salt. Put in a pot or frying pan and add some of the cooking liquid to the bread and vinegar. Bring to a boil.  To serve place pork mixture in a bowl and pour over the gallentine..

 And then this morning…..

To Boyle a Rabbit with Hearbes on the French Fashion.

Fit your Rabbit for the boyling, and seeth it with a little Mutton broth, white Wine, and a peece of Mace: then take Lettuce, Spynage, Parsley, winter Savory, sweet Marioram : all these being pickt, and washt cleane, bruise them with the backe of a Ladle (for the bruising of the Herbes wil make the broth looke very pleasantly greene.) Thicken it with a crust of Manchet, being steeped in some of the broth, and a little sweet Butter therein. Seasono it with verges, and Pepper, and serve it to the Table upon Sippets. Garnish your Dish with Barberyes.

- Murrell, John. A Newe Booke of Cookerie. 1617. London: FW, p. 4.

Rabbit  boyled in the French Fashion

Rabbit boyled in the French Fashion

 

While someone else was….

To roast a Chine, Rib, Loin, Brisket, or Fillet of Beef.

Draw them with parsely, rosemary, tyme, sweet marjaoram, sage, winter savory, or lemon, or plain without any of them, fresh or salt, as you please; broach it, or spit it, roast it and baste it with butter; a good chine of beef will ask six hours roasting.

For the sauce take strait tops of rosemary, sage-leaves, picked parsley, tyme, and sweet marjoram; and strew them in wine vinegar, and the beef gravy; or otherways with gravy and juyce of oranges and lemons. Sometimes for change in saucers of vinegar and pepper.

-         May, Robert. The Accomplisht Cook. 1685 ed (Prospect Books), p. 113.

although it was porket ribs and not beef..

Roasting....

Roasting….

Ribs on spits

Ribs on spits

Mistress of the sauce for the roasting ribs

Mistress of the sauce for the roasting ribs

 

and yet another housewife was making….

 

The best Pancake.

To make the best Pancake, take two or three Egges, and breake them into a dish, and beate them well then adde unto them a pretty quantitie of faire running water, and beate all well together: then put in Cloves, Mace, Cinamon, and a Nutmeg, and season it with Salt: which done, make it thicke as you thinke good with fine Wheat flower: then frie the cakes as thin as may be with sweete Butter, or sweete Seame[1], and make them browne, and so serve them up with Sugar strowed upon them.  There be some which mix Pancakes with new Milke or Creame, but that makes them tough, cloying, and not so crispe, pleasant, and savorie as running water.

- 1618, Markham, Best ed. p. 66



[1] 1530    J. Palsgrave Lesclarcissement 269/1   Seme for to frye with, seyn de povrceau. 1691    J. Ray Coll. Eng. Words 131   Saime, which we pronounce sometimes Seame. It signifies not only Goose-grease, but in general any kind of Grease or Sewet or Oil, wherewith out Clothiers anoint‥their Wool.

 and then made pancakes even BETTER by….

To make Pancakes so crisp that you may set them upright.

Make a dozen or score of them in a little frying pan, no bigger then a Sawcer, & then boil them in Lard, and they will look as yellow as golde, beside the taste.

- 1615 Murrell, p. 30

There are no photos of the pancakes….but they were there, really!

A simple Salllet iof spinach (picked from Village Gardens!) also disappeared before it could be documented

A simple Salllet of spinach (picked from Village Gardens!) also disappeared before it could be documented

 

Wamblecropt!

Wamblecropt!

The Littlest Musketeer

The Littlest Musketeer

 

 

 

Bill of Fare for a Bride-ale

September 24th, 2013 by KM Wall

Bill of Fare for the Bride-ale

Of Experience Mitchell and Jane Cooke

September 21, 2013/1627

 

The happy couple

The happy couple

First Course

To prepare raw Salads

To Prepare Raw Salads                                Rose 45

 Take Head Lettuce, Leaf Lettuce, Curly Lettuce, Lamb’s Lettuce, also the shoots of the Dandelions or wild Chicory, also the shoots of Chicory roots, Endive, or red and white Cabbage or Cucumbers, whatever one has on hand that is best or that is in season and all well cleaned is eaten with a good Oil of Olives, Vinegar, and Salt.  On some salads, additional herbs are used according to everyone’s desire, but the usual are Cress, Mint, Purslane, Burnet, Rocket, Tarragon, . . . one may also add the flowers of Bugloss, Borage, Rose, and Calendula.  This salad is also eaten with melted Butter and Vinegar gently heated together instead of Oil and Vinegar, according to everyone’s desire.

Van raeuwe Saladen te bereyden.               Forbes 17

 Neemt Kroppen/ Latouwe/ Krul-Salaet/ Vette of Hoorn-salaet/ oock de uytspruytsels van de Paerde-bloemen/ oft wilde Chicoraye/ oock uytspruytsels van Chicoray-wortels/ Endivie/ of roode en witte Kool/ of Komkommers/ ‘t geen men best heeft/ ofte in de tijde is/ en een van alle wel scoon gemaeckt zijnde/ wordt met Olie van Olivjen, Azijn en Sout gegeten: over den sommige worden gebruyckt toe-kruyden/ yeder tot believen/ doch de gemeene zijn Kars/ Nepte/ Porseleyn/ Pimpernel/ Raket/ Dragon/ Boteris(?); oock doet men daer over de bloemen van Boglos/ Bernagie/ Roosen en Goudts-bloemen: Men eet dese Sala oock wel met gesmolten Boter en Azijn/ tot yeders believen

To smore an Old Coney, Ducks, or Mallard, on the French fashion

To fry Mussels, Perywinckels, or Oysters, to serve with a Ducke, or single by themselves

To smore an old Coney, Ducke, or Mallard, on the French Fashsion.

                Parboyle any of these, and halfe roast it, launch them downe the breast with your knife, and stick them with two or three Cloves.  Then put them into a Pipkin with halfe a pound of sweet Butter, a little white Wine Vergis, a piece of whole Mace, a little beaten Ginger, and Pepper. then mince the two Onyons very small, with a piece of an Apple, so let them boyle leisurely, close covered, the space of two howers, turning them now and then.  Serve them upon Sippets.

Murrell, John. A New Booke of Cookerie. London: FW. 1615. p. 31.

-         .To frye Mussels, Perywinckels, or Oysters, to serve with a Ducke, or single by themselves.

 Boyle these shell-Fishes: then flowre  and frye them: then put them in a Pipkin, with a pinte of Claret Wine, Sinamon, Sugar, and Pepper. Take your Ducke boyled or roasted, and put them into two several Pipkins, if one be boyles, and the other roasted, and a little Sugar, large Mace, and fryed toasts, stuck round about it with Butter.

-        Murrell, John. A New Booke of Cookerie. London: FW. 1615. p. 31.

To fricassee konijn

To fricassee[1] konijn (rabbit)…

 ……After they have been cleaned cut them in pieces and then they are boiled in a deep pan with water for an hour and a half.  When the water is drained off fry them in Butter, pour on a sauce from Butter, cut Parsley, egg yolks with Verjuice, Mace, and Nutmegs, Probatum est[2].  Hens, Capons, Turkeys, Rabbits, and Pheasants as well as others that are young can be prepared in the same manner.

- Rose, p. 55


[1] A fricassee is a dish of meat that is boiled and then fried.

[2] It has been proved

To fry Mussels in the Pan

 To Fry Mussels in the Pan

Take Mussels, take them from the Shell while alive, place them on an earthenware colander so that the juices drain off, then roll in Wheat-flour with some Salt, fried in Oil or Butter and eaten with some Verjuice is good to those who like them.

-         Rose, ed. The Sensible Cook (Dutch, 17th c) p. 71

To boil a Pudding which is uncommonly good

To boil a Pudding which is uncommonly good.

Take a pond and [a] half of Wheat-flour, three quarter pond of Currents washed clean, a half pond Kidney-suet, cut it very small, 3 Eggs, one and a half Nutmegs, grated fine, a little Salt, mix it with a little sweet Milk so dry that one kneads it like a Bread and tie it in a clean cloth rather close and throw it into a pot with boiling water and let it boil for two hours, then it is done.

-                     The Sensible Cook, Rose ed. p. 79.

To butter Gourds, Pumpions, Cucumbers or Muskmelons

 To butter Gourds, Pumpions, Cucumbers or Muskmelons.

Cut them into pieces, and pare and cleanse them; then have a boiling pan of water, and when it boils put in the pumpions, &c. with some salt, being boil’d, drain them well from the water, butter them, and serve them on sippets with pepper.

- Robert May

Chewits of Turkey

To make minced Pies or Chewits of a Leg of Veal, Neats-Tongue, Turkey, or Capon.

Take to a good leg of veal six pound of beef-suet, then take the leg of veal, bone it, parboil it, and mince it very fine when it is hot; mince the suet by it self very fine also, then when they are cold mingle them together, then season the meat with a pound of sliced dates, a pound of sugar, an ounce of nutmegs, an ounce of pepper, an ounce of cinamon, half an ounce of ginger, half a pint of verjuyce, a pint of rose-water, a preserved orange, or any peel fine minced, an ounce of caraway-comfits, and six pound of currans; put all these into a large tray with half a handful of salt, stir them up all together, and fill your pies, close them up, bake them, and being baked, ice them with double refined sugar, rose-water, and butter.

Make the paste with a peck of flour, and two pound of butter boil’d in fair water or liquor, make it up boiling hot.

Robert May

To make a Custard

To make a Custard

Take a pint of sweet Milk, let it come to a boil, stir it until it is almost cold, then take 8 Eggs from which the Cicatricle has been removed and which have been well beaten, with half mutsjen Rosewater, two spoons of Sugar, and stir that into the Milk in a dish or Custard-pan, place it on a slow fire, but on the lid a little more fire and let it stand until it is stiff, but it should not boil.

Rose, tran. The Sensible Cook.p. 71-2.

 

 

Second Course

To roast a Bream on a spit

To boil a Wild Duck

Om een jonge Henne te vullen

(A young hen to farce)

To fry Olie-koecken

Chewits of Turkey

 

 Manchet bread, spice cake and rosehip tart at both courses

Recipes from the second course tomorrow…..also some more images of the day….did you notice the emphasis on the Dutch cookbook? Guess where the Cookes and the Mitchells lived before Plimouth Colony?

Conies and rabets and hares (Oh, my!)

August 27th, 2013 by KM Wall

Coneys and rabbits and hares aren’t quite the same thing, although they might be used interchangeably.

Rabbits are technically baby conies.

Rabbit from Winnie the Pooh - his grown-up name should be Coney

Rabbit from Winnie the Pooh – his grown-up name should be Coney

 

Coney from Topsells History of Four-footed Beasts

Coney from Topsell’s History of Four-footed Beasts

Conies may be raised for food use (or for pelt use – rabbit was used to line cloaks, among other things). Hares are wild creatures that are caught (and therefore may have a more ‘gamey ‘ taste).

Hare from Topsell's History of Four-footed Beasts

Hare from Topsell’s History of Four-footed Beasts

How to bake Conies, Rabets, or Hares, with fruit or without fruit.

Season them with Pepper and Salte, Cloves and mace, and so laye them into your paste with Corance or Prunes, great Raisins and if you will: butter and a little vergious.

1591. A.W. A Book of Cookrye

Bunnies, in the 17th century, are bunions and not little woodland creatures at all.

Bugs Bunny - would have had a different name - or a different LOOK- in the 17th century

Bugs Bunny – would have had a different name – or a different LOOK- in the 17th century

Smoared Hare

June 28th, 2013 by KM Wall

Smoared? As in a toasted marshmallow, Hersey bar and Graham cracker S’mored?

Microwave S'more

Microwave S’more

What do s’mores have to do with the 17th century or strawberries?

Nothing. In the 17th century marshmallow is a plant, and neither Hersey nor Graham have been born; hence no bar, no cracker.

Marshmallow plant

Marshmallow plant

Smoring is a cooking technique, one still alive in the American South, as well in other regions.  Smooring is another way to say smothered. Maya Angelou has a recipe that Oprah calls “suffocated chicken”.  What it really is is a very special cross between a stew and a braise.

And delicious, very very tasty good.

A Mallard smoard, or a Hare, or old Cony.

Take a Mallard when it is cleane dressed, washed and trust, and parboyle it in water till it be skumd and purified; then take it up, and put it into a Pipkin with the neck down-ward, and the tayle upward, standing as it were upright;[note: if the neck is pointing down and the tail pointing up, this is not a standing mallard, but a feeding one.]  then fill the Pipkin halfe full with that water, in which the Mallard parboyled, and fill up the other halfe with White Wine;[that is . parboil the dear thing a little longer, then top it off with white wine and keep cooking] then pill and slice thin a good quantitie of Onyons, [that is. peel and slice those onions, thinly] and put them in with whole fine Hearbs, according to the time of the yeare, as Lettice, Strawberry leaves, Violet leaves, Vines leaves, Spinage, Endive, Succorie, and such like, which have no bitter or hard taste, [leafy green additions ; you're looking for a fresh taste. Notice the strawberry LEAVES]-  and a pretty quantitie of Currants and dates sliced; then cover it close, and set it on a gentle fire, and let it stew, and smoare [to smother, to cook in a closed vessel] till the Hearbs and Onyons be soft, and the Mallard enough; then take out the Mallard, and carve it as it were to goe to the Table; then to the Broath put a good lumpe of Butter, Sugar, Cianmon; and if it be in some, so many Goose-berries as will give it a sharpe taste, but in the Winter as much Wine Vinegar; then heate it on the fire, and stirre all well together; then lay the Mallard in a dish with Sippets, and powre all this broth upon it; then trim the Egges of the dish with Sugar, and so serve it up.  And in this manner you may also smoare the hinder parts of a Hare, or a whole old Conie, being trust up close together.

-         Markham, Best ed.p 78.

European rabbit - the young ones are called coneys (think Coney Island, but say it like honey and money

European rabbit – the young ones are called coneys (think Coney Island, but say it like honey and money.

A hare is more like a jack rabbit then a bunny rabbit

A hare is more like a jack rabbit then a bunny rabbith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Pipkin is an earthen ware pot, and one of the rabbits in Watership Down.

 

Pipkin_LG

Pipkin – repro from Plimoth Plantation. You’ll need a slightly larger pipkin to hold a rabbit or a duck.


Rabbit Season

October 13th, 2012 by KM Wall

European Hare

American Hare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Hare in New-England is no bigger than our English Rabbets, of the same colour, but withal having yellow and black strokes down the ribs; in Winter they are milk white, and as the Spring approacheth they come to their colour; when the Snow lies upon the ground they are very bitter with feeding upon the bark of Spruce, and the like.”

-  1672.John Josselyn, New-Englands Rarities Discovered. Mass. Hist.ed. p.22.

“Here are great store of Coneys* in these parts, of diverse colors: some white, some black, and some gray. Those towards the southern parts are very small, but those to the north are as big as the English Cony: their ears are very short. For the meat the small rabbit is as good as any that I have eaten of elsewhere.”

*(Rhymes with ‘money’ and ‘honey’. A rabbit is a young coney (like a puppy is a young dog…) no bunnies please, unless you mean bunions.)

1637Thomas Morton, New English Canaan, Dempsey ed. p.76

 

Rabbit season starts the Saturday after Columbus Day – which means in 2012 Duck Season and Rabbit Season start on the same day – today! Rabbits (conies) and hares are not the same animal, although they are often cooked in a  similar fashion.

European rabbit

American rabbit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Mallard smoard, or a Hare, or old Cony

Take a Mallard when it is cleane dressed, washed and trust, and parboyle it in water till it be skumd and purified; then take it up, and put it into a Pipkin with the neck down-ward, and the tayle upward, standing as it were upright; then fill the Pipkin halfe full with that water, in which the Mallard parboyled, and fill up the other halfe with White Wine; then pill and slice thin a good quantitie of Onyons, and put them in with whole fine Hearbs, according to the time of the yeare, as Lettice, Strawberry leaves, Violet leaves, Vines leaves, Spinage, Endive, Succorie, and such like, which have no bitter or hard taste, and a pretty quantitie of Currants and ates sliced; then cover it close, and set it on a gentle fire, and let it stew, and smoare (to smother, to cook in a closed vessel) till the Hearbs and Onyons be soft, and the Mallard enough; then take out the Mallard, and carve it as it were to goe to the Table; then to the Broath put a good lumpe of Butter, Sugar, Cianmon; and if it be in some, so many Goose-berries as will give it a sharpe taste, but in the Winter as much Wine Vinegar; then heate it on the fire, and stirre all well together; then lay the Mallard in a dish with Sippets, and powre all this broth upon it; then trim the Egges of the dish with Sugar, and so serve it up. And in this manner you may also smoare the hinder parts of a Hare, or a whole old Conie, being trust up close together.

- Gervase Markham, The English Housewife p. 78.

 

Eastern Cottontail- run quick, like a bunny!

 

 

 

Albrect Durer - A Young Hare

 

 

Two Rabbits in a Landscape

 

 

Coney rhymes with money and honey

April 10th, 2012 by KM Wall

“Here [New England] there are great store of Coneys in these parts, of diverse colors: some white, some black, some gray. Those towards the southern parts are very small, but those to the north are as big as the English Cony: their ears are very short. For the meat the small rabbit is as good as any that I have eaten of elsewhere.”
- Thomas Morton. New English Canaan. 1637. Dempsey ed. p. 76.

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