Tagged ‘pudding’

National Indian Pudding Day

November 13th, 2013 by KM Wall

Sampe Fest wasn’t just about Jonnycakes….

It was also about Indian Pudding. Or as it was sometimes referred to:

Indian-meal Pudding

Samp Fest 2013

Samp Fest 2013

Big Batch Indian Pudding

3 Quarts milk

2 cups cornmeal (Plimoth Grist Mill cornmeal is the best!)

1 jar (12 ounces) molasses (non-sulphered or mild)

1 stick butter (1/4 pound)

6 eggs

4 teaspoons cinnamon

2 tsp ginger

 

 

Butter a large slow cooker and pre-heat on high.

Use a large heavy bottomed pan on the stove (so the milk doesn’t scorch). The milk will rise up when it heats, so give it plenty of room. When the milk is just under a boil (lots of bubbles forming), whisk in the cornmeal; keep stirring until the cornmeal thickens about 10-15 minutes. Add the rest of the butter, turn off the heat and cover the pan.

Beat the eggs with the molasses and the spices.

Add some of the hot corn/milk mixture to temper the eggs and then add that to the rest of the corn mixture. Blend thoroughly. Scrape into the buttered, pre-heat slow cooker.

Cook on low for 6-8 hours.

Serve with vanilla ice cream, whipped cream or light cream…..

 

Options:

Raisins, cranberries or chopped apples may be added into the slow cooker, either a little or a lot.

There’s a real divide with the fruit people – they love it or hate it!

 

It’s also good re-heated for breakfast.

 Cinnamon whipped cream is also pretty heavenly….

plimoth grist mill prodcut

 

 

 

In for a Penny (Loaf)….

October 16th, 2013 by KM Wall

….in for a pound.

In celebration of National B read Day, a smidgeon more on Maize, Indian corn and bread in New England before there were mills, corn bread being the most common sort of bread, maize being the most common sort of corn.

“It [maize] is light of digestion, and the English make a kind of Loblolly of it, to eat with Milk, which they call Sampe ; they beat it in a Morter, and sift the flower out of it; the remainder they call Homminey, which they put in a Pot of two or three Gallons, with Water, and boyl it upon a gentle Fire till it be like Hasty Pudden; they put of this into Milk, and so eat it. Their Bread also they make of the Homminey so boiled, and mix their Flower with it, cast it into a deep Bason in which they form the loaf, and then turn it out upon the Peel, and presently put it into the Oven before it spreads abroad; the Flower makes excellent Puddens.”

- Josslyn, John. New Englands rarities. 1672. Mass. Historical Society, 1972, p. 52.

And now with pictures….Kathy Devlin, Colonial Foodways Artisan, took these photos in the modern kitchen making the back-up bread.

It [maize] is light of digestion, and the English make a kind of Loblolly of it, to eat with Milk, which they call Sampe ; they beat it in a Morter, and sift the flower out of it; 

Maize

Maize – before it is beaten

and sift the flower out of it;

the remainder they call Homminey, which they put in a Pot of two or three Gallons, with Water, and boyl it upon a gentle Fire till it be like Hasty Pudden;

Ground corn, flour gone, in a pot with water, waiting to boil...

Ground corn, flour gone, in a pot with water, waiting to boil…

Boiling

Boiling

Boiling

Boiling

Boiling

Boiling

Like Hasty Pudden

Like Hasty Pudden

 

Their Bread also they make of the Homminey so boiled, and mix their Flower with it,

Flour and cooked corn groats together - wait till it isn't hot enough to burn you....

Flour and cooked corn groats together – wait till it isn’t hot enough to burn you….

cast it into a deep Bason in which they form the loaf,

A  bowl - size bases on the the size of the oven and the size we'd like of the finished loaf....

A basin (or bowl) – size based on the the size of the oven and the size we’d like  the finished loaf….

Flour, cooked samp or homminey together in a bowl.....

Flour, cooked samp or homminey together in a bowl…..

and then turn it out upon the Peel,

Not exactly a peel, rather the silpat sheet it'll be baked on in the modern oven

Not exactly a peel, rather the silpat sheet it’ll be baked on in the modern oven

and presently put it into the Oven before it spreads abroad

Bread in the modern oven

Bread in the modern oven

The finished loaves

The finished loaves

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lagniappe

October 15th, 2013 by KM Wall

something a little extra re: Italian Puddings…..

Richard Sax

Richard Sax

All the while, while  dipping in Italian  Pudding I  kept  thinking I was smelling  chocolate. Serious chocolate.

There is no chocolate mentioned in ANY of the 17th century English cookbooks I was searching through  AT ALL …..and then I remembered.

In Richard Sax’s Classic Home Desserts – which is a totally great cookbook, with wonderful recipes, great photos and stories and histories – there is an Italian Bread Pudding.

It is baked (or bakte).

The bread is cut into cubes. (Are you getting chills yet?)

In with the eggs and cream, there is also  chocolate.

Taste and memory, working together again.

Classic Home Dessert - Richard Sax

Classic Home Desserts – Richard Sax

Budino Nero (Italian Chocolate Bread Pudding)

First published in 1994, the book is still in print, so to avoid copyright issues, let me tell you that basically it’s the same Italian Pudding that John Murrell and W.I make, with equal amounts of semi-sweet chocolate and cubed bread by weight. That is, 3 ounces of bread (which is about 4 cups cubed) should have 3 ounces of chopped semi-sweet chocolate . Melt the chocolate in the cream or milk, before beating in the eggs (let it cool a little, don’t be impatient) and then gently add the cubed bread. Put it into a greased dish, bake  – not too hot, at 350° for about 1/2 an hour – don’t bake it too long – it should be a little wobbly, but it will firm up as it cools. You can add some sugar in, or wait to scrape – or sprinkle  -some on top.

Cacao - from John Gerard, The Herbal

Cacao – and other odd bobs of things – from Johnson on Gerard,The Herbal, 1633.

Chocolate in early 17th century had some PR issues. The name – Cacao -say it aloud, you know what it means, – means, well, sh_t in Spanish, and the same for Englishmen. I believe it was the Dutch who changed it to “Cocao”. What a difference one little letter makes. The rest is, as we say, HISTORY.

A giant Budina Nero – made in the large size Pyrex bowl was

The big one - and it was also a green one

The big one – and it was also a green one

 the BEST Birthday Cake EVER.

For the life of me I can’t remember which birthday, but it probably ended with a zero or a five….and the pudding was made by assorted Foodways deities  was a surprise and a delight. And a taste memory extraordinaire.

 

Italian Pudding bakte

October 14th, 2013 by KM Wall

It IS Columbus Day, after all. And although there is Italian bisket to consider, and how or how not, it is different from Naples bisket…..

Coat of Arms the House of Colon (that would be Christopher Columbus)

Coat of Arms the House of Colon (that would be Christopher Columbus, his house)

As I was looking at baked goods, and baked pudding in particular, I found not one, not two, but  THREE Italian puddings.

  1. They are all baked (or bakte – say it as it is spelled….now you’re talking like Shakespeare!)
  2. They all have bread cut into a dice, like a die, the little thing you toss in games of chance.
  3. Two of the three are from the same author – John Murrell – in different cookbooks  BUT they’re not exactly the  same. No cut and paste from John Murrell. I thought there were three from John Murrell, but the New Book of Cookerie and Book 1 of Two Books of Cookerie and Carving are the same book.  Three citations, two recipes.

All three, in chronological order:

To make an Italian Pudding

Take a Penny white Loafe, pare off the crust, and cut it in square pieces like unto great Dyes, mince a pound of Beefe Suite small: take halfe a pound of Razins of the Sunne, stone them and mingle them together with, and season them with Sugar, Rosewater, and Nutmegge, wet these things in foure Egges, and stirre them very tenderly for breaking the Bread: then put it into a Dish, and pricke three or foure pieces of  Marrow, and some sliced Dates: put it into an Oven hot enough for a Chewet: if your Oven be too hot, it will burne: if too colde, it will be heavy: when it is bakte scrape on Sugar, and serve it hot at Dinner, but not at Supper.

1615. John Murrell. A Newe Booke of Cookerie. Falconwood Press: 1989. p. 22.

This is the one you’ve seen before here  in If your Oven be too hot….(Sept 15, 2013)

And now John Murrell’s second Italian Pudding:

A bakte Pudding after the Italian fashion.

Pare off the crusts from a penny white loafe, cut it in square peeces like dice, put to it halfe a pounds of dubbing suet minct small, halfe a pound of Raisins of the Sunne, the stones taken out, two ounces of Suger, five or sixe sliced Dates, a graine of Muske, five or sixe lumps of Marrow : season these with Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and Salt, but a very little Salt is sufficient, beate a couple of Egges, with foure or five spoonefuls of Creame, power it upon your seasoned bread, and stirre very  gentley for breaking, so as the peeces may be wet, but not so wet that you can see any moisture in them: lay a Pomewater in the bottome of the Dish, or some sort of soft Apple pared, and sliced thinne, put your Pudding also upon the Apple, and so set the Dish into an Oven, as hot as for Manchet, or small Pies, when you see it rise yellow take downe your Oven lidde to coole your Oven, it will be bakte in half an houre: if the Oven be too hot, it will be burnt, if it be too cold, it will be too heavy, when it is bakte draw it forth, and scrape on Sugar, and serve it hot to the Table.

- 1638. John Murrell. The Second Book of Cookerie. Fifth Impression. Stuart Press: 1993. p. 25.

Square pieces of bread – check. Dubbing suet?? – I’m coming up cold; Muske – this is taking it up a notch; Cream as well as eggs – makes this richer; taking down tour oven lidde to cool the oven – nice detail! This is how you control the heat in a woodfired oven. The same advice about too cold and too hot, making me think this is a real Goldilocks moment.

Once again, you are asked to stone the raisins. Thank you Sun Maid for drying seedless raisins, so we don’t have to do that anymore!

130px-Sun-Maid_1916The Pomewater is a type of apple – nice of him to mention that any soft apple will do.

A few of the many Apples in Gerard's Herbal

A few of the many apples in Gerard’s Herbal

The third Italian Pudding comes from someone else, a little later…..

To make an Italian Pudding.

Take a manchet, and cut it into square pieces like a Die, then put to it half a pound of beef suet minced small, Raisins of the Sun the stones picked out, Cloves, Mace, minced, Dates, Sugar, Marrow, Rose-water, Eggs, and Cream, mingle all these together, and put them into a dish fir for your stuffe, in less then an hour it will be baked, then scrape on Sugar, and serve it.

- 1653. W.I. A True Gentlewomans Delight. Falconwood Press: 1991. p. 45.

 

 

 

Bill of Fare for a Bride-ale

September 24th, 2013 by KM Wall

Bill of Fare for the Bride-ale

Of Experience Mitchell and Jane Cooke

September 21, 2013/1627

 

The happy couple

The happy couple

First Course

To prepare raw Salads

To Prepare Raw Salads                                Rose 45

 Take Head Lettuce, Leaf Lettuce, Curly Lettuce, Lamb’s Lettuce, also the shoots of the Dandelions or wild Chicory, also the shoots of Chicory roots, Endive, or red and white Cabbage or Cucumbers, whatever one has on hand that is best or that is in season and all well cleaned is eaten with a good Oil of Olives, Vinegar, and Salt.  On some salads, additional herbs are used according to everyone’s desire, but the usual are Cress, Mint, Purslane, Burnet, Rocket, Tarragon, . . . one may also add the flowers of Bugloss, Borage, Rose, and Calendula.  This salad is also eaten with melted Butter and Vinegar gently heated together instead of Oil and Vinegar, according to everyone’s desire.

Van raeuwe Saladen te bereyden.               Forbes 17

 Neemt Kroppen/ Latouwe/ Krul-Salaet/ Vette of Hoorn-salaet/ oock de uytspruytsels van de Paerde-bloemen/ oft wilde Chicoraye/ oock uytspruytsels van Chicoray-wortels/ Endivie/ of roode en witte Kool/ of Komkommers/ ‘t geen men best heeft/ ofte in de tijde is/ en een van alle wel scoon gemaeckt zijnde/ wordt met Olie van Olivjen, Azijn en Sout gegeten: over den sommige worden gebruyckt toe-kruyden/ yeder tot believen/ doch de gemeene zijn Kars/ Nepte/ Porseleyn/ Pimpernel/ Raket/ Dragon/ Boteris(?); oock doet men daer over de bloemen van Boglos/ Bernagie/ Roosen en Goudts-bloemen: Men eet dese Sala oock wel met gesmolten Boter en Azijn/ tot yeders believen

To smore an Old Coney, Ducks, or Mallard, on the French fashion

To fry Mussels, Perywinckels, or Oysters, to serve with a Ducke, or single by themselves

To smore an old Coney, Ducke, or Mallard, on the French Fashsion.

                Parboyle any of these, and halfe roast it, launch them downe the breast with your knife, and stick them with two or three Cloves.  Then put them into a Pipkin with halfe a pound of sweet Butter, a little white Wine Vergis, a piece of whole Mace, a little beaten Ginger, and Pepper. then mince the two Onyons very small, with a piece of an Apple, so let them boyle leisurely, close covered, the space of two howers, turning them now and then.  Serve them upon Sippets.

Murrell, John. A New Booke of Cookerie. London: FW. 1615. p. 31.

-         .To frye Mussels, Perywinckels, or Oysters, to serve with a Ducke, or single by themselves.

 Boyle these shell-Fishes: then flowre  and frye them: then put them in a Pipkin, with a pinte of Claret Wine, Sinamon, Sugar, and Pepper. Take your Ducke boyled or roasted, and put them into two several Pipkins, if one be boyles, and the other roasted, and a little Sugar, large Mace, and fryed toasts, stuck round about it with Butter.

-        Murrell, John. A New Booke of Cookerie. London: FW. 1615. p. 31.

To fricassee konijn

To fricassee[1] konijn (rabbit)…

 ……After they have been cleaned cut them in pieces and then they are boiled in a deep pan with water for an hour and a half.  When the water is drained off fry them in Butter, pour on a sauce from Butter, cut Parsley, egg yolks with Verjuice, Mace, and Nutmegs, Probatum est[2].  Hens, Capons, Turkeys, Rabbits, and Pheasants as well as others that are young can be prepared in the same manner.

- Rose, p. 55


[1] A fricassee is a dish of meat that is boiled and then fried.

[2] It has been proved

To fry Mussels in the Pan

 To Fry Mussels in the Pan

Take Mussels, take them from the Shell while alive, place them on an earthenware colander so that the juices drain off, then roll in Wheat-flour with some Salt, fried in Oil or Butter and eaten with some Verjuice is good to those who like them.

-         Rose, ed. The Sensible Cook (Dutch, 17th c) p. 71

To boil a Pudding which is uncommonly good

To boil a Pudding which is uncommonly good.

Take a pond and [a] half of Wheat-flour, three quarter pond of Currents washed clean, a half pond Kidney-suet, cut it very small, 3 Eggs, one and a half Nutmegs, grated fine, a little Salt, mix it with a little sweet Milk so dry that one kneads it like a Bread and tie it in a clean cloth rather close and throw it into a pot with boiling water and let it boil for two hours, then it is done.

-                     The Sensible Cook, Rose ed. p. 79.

To butter Gourds, Pumpions, Cucumbers or Muskmelons

 To butter Gourds, Pumpions, Cucumbers or Muskmelons.

Cut them into pieces, and pare and cleanse them; then have a boiling pan of water, and when it boils put in the pumpions, &c. with some salt, being boil’d, drain them well from the water, butter them, and serve them on sippets with pepper.

- Robert May

Chewits of Turkey

To make minced Pies or Chewits of a Leg of Veal, Neats-Tongue, Turkey, or Capon.

Take to a good leg of veal six pound of beef-suet, then take the leg of veal, bone it, parboil it, and mince it very fine when it is hot; mince the suet by it self very fine also, then when they are cold mingle them together, then season the meat with a pound of sliced dates, a pound of sugar, an ounce of nutmegs, an ounce of pepper, an ounce of cinamon, half an ounce of ginger, half a pint of verjuyce, a pint of rose-water, a preserved orange, or any peel fine minced, an ounce of caraway-comfits, and six pound of currans; put all these into a large tray with half a handful of salt, stir them up all together, and fill your pies, close them up, bake them, and being baked, ice them with double refined sugar, rose-water, and butter.

Make the paste with a peck of flour, and two pound of butter boil’d in fair water or liquor, make it up boiling hot.

Robert May

To make a Custard

To make a Custard

Take a pint of sweet Milk, let it come to a boil, stir it until it is almost cold, then take 8 Eggs from which the Cicatricle has been removed and which have been well beaten, with half mutsjen Rosewater, two spoons of Sugar, and stir that into the Milk in a dish or Custard-pan, place it on a slow fire, but on the lid a little more fire and let it stand until it is stiff, but it should not boil.

Rose, tran. The Sensible Cook.p. 71-2.

 

 

Second Course

To roast a Bream on a spit

To boil a Wild Duck

Om een jonge Henne te vullen

(A young hen to farce)

To fry Olie-koecken

Chewits of Turkey

 

 Manchet bread, spice cake and rosehip tart at both courses

Recipes from the second course tomorrow…..also some more images of the day….did you notice the emphasis on the Dutch cookbook? Guess where the Cookes and the Mitchells lived before Plimouth Colony?

If your Oven is too hot it will burn

September 15th, 2013 by KM Wall

That’ s the warning in John Murrell’s  Italian Bread Pudding. Although, the same is true of pretty much anything you put into the too hot oven. John Murrell has two other Italian Puddings throughout his works, all three of which are baked bread puddings. The Italian of this pudding is the fashion of the the making the pudding, not the bread that was used, although good Italian bread would work just fine…….to begin this recipe……

Take a Penny white Loafe

These might be penny white loaves....

These might be penny white loaves….the fat round ones

 

Or the loave might have been a little larger, like these

Or the loaves might have been a little larger, like these

Tsaid penny loafhis is the (silver) penny you'd need to buy

This is said  (silver) penny you’d need to buy the penny loaf

 

 

pare off the crust, and cut it in square pieces like unto great Dyes,

those would be large dice

Dice recovered at Jamestown

Dice recovered at Jamestown – enlarged to show detail

 

 

Simo Gomez - the Dice Players

Simo Gomez – the Dice Players – dice in context -  not so terribly large

To make an Italian Pudding

Take a Penny white Loafe, pare off the crust, and cut it in square pieces like unto great Dyes, mince a pound of Beefe Suite small: take halfe a pound of Razins of the Sunne, stone them and mingle them together with, and season them with Sugar, Rosewater, and Nutmegge, wet these things in foure Egges, and stirre them very tenderly for breaking the Bread: then put it into a Dish, and pricke three or foure pieces of  hoMarrow, and some sliced Dates: put it into an Oven hot enough for a Chewet: if your Oven be too hot, it will burne: if too colde, it will be heavy: when it is bakte scrape on Sugar, and serve it hot at Dinner, but not at Supper.

1615. John Murrell. A Newe Booke of Cookerie. Falconwood Press: 1989. p. 22.

 

I’m not entirely sure what the last line means – might it be served hot at Dinner, upper OR is it to be served hot at at Dinner, but not at Supper at all?

 

Blauncht Maunchet

September 8th, 2013 by KM Wall

isn’t just any manchet. And  To make blancht Manchet in a Frying-pan sounds like an Indie mumble-core film that should be playing at Plimoth Cinema.

And Blancht Manchet could be a movie star…..

Vali Vali - she could have been Blaunchet Maunchet

Vali Vali – she could have been a Blauncht Maunchet

 

Manchet – or Maunchet  – is the very nice, white bread of early modern England. This is back when white bread was very nice – and uncommon. The bread would have been very nice.

To make a blauncht Maunchet in a Frying-pan.

Take a halfe a dozen Egs, halfe a pint of sweet Creame, a penny manchet grated, a Nutmeg grated, two spoonefuls of Rosewater, two ounces of Sugar: worke all stiff like a Pudding: then fry it like a Tansey in a very litle  frying Pan, that it might be thicke: fry it browne, and turne it out upon a plate. Cut it in quarters, and serve it like a Pudding: scrape on Sugar.

1615. John Murrell. A New Booke of Cookerie. Falconwood Press: 1989. p. 16.

NOTES:

  • a penny manchet could be somewhere between 4 ounces and a pound. I’m thinking this particular one would have been closer to a pound, with the liquid of 6 eggs and 8 ounces of cream and some rosewater.
  • It’s interesting to me that the first sugar ref is for 2 ounces, and the second ref has you scraping it (off of a sugar loaf )
  • work it stiff like a pudding is a great pudding detail – and if this isn’t a pudding, what is this????????
  • The pudding that you make in a frying pan is from this same cookbook
  • a Tansey is a dish of eggs…have we done tansies? – anyhow, fried quickly in a pan with butter and flipped over to brown on both sides – and how come they aren’t compared to pancakes?
  • A litle frying pan – you want this thicker, not thinner
  • Again with the pudding comparison – serve it like a pudding, fine – how does one serve puddings?
17th century frying-pan from the Museum of London

17th century frying-pan from the Museum of London

Staff of Life

September 6th, 2013 by KM Wall

Bread – four ingredients, infinite variations.

Bread – it should be easy, because it’s so common. It should be basic, because it is a basic fact of 17th century life.

It should be.

Maybe the problem is the closer you look at something the larger it appears.

Or maybe the problem is the more common something is, the more it’s taken for granted, and not spoken of – much less written about.

Or maybe it really is HUGE.

Bread - 1971

Bread – 1971

Bread – and it’s a great name for a rock band.

 

Bread - Taccuino Sanitatis

Bread – Taccuino Sanitatis

 

According to Gervase Markham in The English Housewife in the baking section, there are three basic Englsih breads:

  • Manchet, or white bread for the well to do or special occasions
  • Cheate, or ordinary or household bread for ordinary people on ordinary days
  • and Brown Bread, which is not the tasty cornmeal, rye and molasses bread that comes in a can
    Brown Bread in a can

    Brown Bread in a can

    but a course, throw every cheap grain/grain substitute in to bulk it up bread for the poor and hard working.

But even in these categories there are divisions and sub categories.

And then there is cake….which is a sort of bread.

And then there are the ways in which bread is used.

Sops and sippets.

Bread crumbs for thickening, for puddings, for dredging.

To make a Pudding in a Frying-panne.

Take foure Egges, two spoonefuls of Rosewater, Nutmeg grated, Sugar, grated Bread, the quantities of a penny Loafe , halfe a pound of Beefe Suit minst fine: worke them as stiffe as a Pudding with your hand, and put it in a Frying-pan with sweet Butter, frye it browne, cut it in quarters, and serve it hot, either at Dinner or Supper. If it be on a fasting day leave out the Suit, and the Currens, and put in two or three Pomewaters minst small, or any other soft Apples that hath a good relish.

1615. John Murrell. A New Booke of Cookerie. Falconwood Press: p. 21.

NOTES:

  • pennyloafe could be a whole wheat ‘householde’ loaf that weighs about 2 pounds; a pound of breadcrumbs to 1/2 pound of suet is one rich pudding
  • Leaving out the Currens came as a little surprise to me, too, because their inclusion isn’t actually written in. So by all means add some (and thank you Anna Mo for pointing out that in a modern kitchen, mini chocolate chips  are a nifty sub for currents) or use apples – a soft apple with good relish  – maybe a Macintosh or Macoun  or a Paula Red ….

 

small Dutch frying pan - see the ALMA site for more, more, more!

small Dutch frying pan – see the ALMA site for more, more, more!

 

 

Pudding Pie

August 31st, 2013 by KM Wall

To make the end of a month of pie, let us circle around to puddings. The Pudding Pie.

Which sounds like a cue for:

Georgie Porgie pudding and pie,
Kissed the girls and made them cry
When the boys came out to play,
Georgie Porgie ran away.

This little rhyme  has eighteenth century origins, possibly, and most definitely  nineteenth century provenance  BUT there is some speculation that the aforementioned Georgie was none other then

George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham

George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham

His Grace George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham

28 August 1592 – 23 August 1628

The 1st Duke of Buckingham was most definitely a 17th century figure. Evidently, ‘Georgie’ was not only the favorite of James I, King of England, but (if novels are to be believed, the novel being The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas pere) also the Queen of France.

So that was a nice little side  trip to fanciful. Back to food.

Pudding Pie. Puddings, which had formerly been in guts, and then in guts and bags, are being moved into the oven, often with pastry. Hence, the Pudding Pie.

Pudding Pie – the best of both the pudding and the pie.

To bake a pudding pie.

Take a quart of the best cream, and set on the fire, and slice a loaf of the lightest white bread into thin slices, and put it into it, and let it stand on the fire till the milk begin to rise: then take it off, and put it into a basin, and let it stand till it be cold: then put in the yolks of four eggs, and two whites, good store of currants, sugar, cinnamon, cloves, mace, and plenty of sheep’s suet finely shred, and good season of salt; then trim your pot very well round about with butter, and so put in your pudding, and bake it sufficiently, then when you serve, strew sugar upon it.

1631. Gervase Markham. The English Housewife. Best ed. pp. 109-10

 

3 Musketeers candy bar, also good, but no Pudding Pie

3 Musketeers candy bar, also good, but no Pudding Pie

Puddinggrass

May 24th, 2013 by KM Wall
Hedeoma pulgiodes - false pudding grass

Hedeoma pulgiodes – false pudding grass

Mentha pulegium - Pudding Grass!

Mentha pulegium – Pudding Grass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parkinson Paradisus 477 Pennyroyall..vsed to be put into puddings,..and therefore in diuers places they know it by no other name then Pudding-grasse.

Now, dear Mr. Parkinson, how is that this herb that is named for it’s use  in puddings so seldom shows up in pudding recipes?

And frankly – GOOD THING:

Pregnant women and children under the age of 15 should not use this herb.  Do not use oil extract orally as it is highly toxic.  Do not exceed dosage amounts.

With any herb, there is the risk of an allergic reaction. Small children and pregnant women should use additional caution when considering the use of herbal remedies.

Which begs another question – how can the people of the past get away eating and otherwise ingesting things that we now know to be unsafe?

  1. Toxic load is different for different people in different times and in different place. Possibly there was a less toxic form of the herb available or perhaps we’re now exposed to things that make what was once inert, very dangerous OR
  2. When the leading cause of death is ‘suddenly’ appropriate cause and effect relationships aren’t always noted.

So this is a caveat – before we continue in the garden, before we try things merely because someone in the past wrote it down, before we try to be authentic in every detail in recreating old recipes, we must be safe.

Safety First.

Live to tell about it.

All the lovely herbals and books of medicine and even the cookbooks and commonplace books and receipt-books of the past are a great place to start BUT find a good modern herbal reference and use it often before ingesting anything.

There are websites (American Botanical Council or ABC) and books (John Lust The Herb Book is a personal quick and easy reference guide). Check them out before you eat! When in doubt, DON’T.

 

Skull and Crossbones - warning of  poison  AND sign of Cemetary entrance

Skull and Crossbones – warning of poison AND sign of Cemetery entrance

 

“256. A Pennyroyall Puding.

Take 6 Eggs beat them very well and halfe a pint of creame one Nutmeg grated a litle sugar and salt then take a good quantity of parsley penyroyall Marygold flowrs shred very small put them to the creame and Eggs with 4 spoonfulls of sack half a p[ound] of Corance and almost a p[ound] of Beefe suet shred a topeny loafe grated stir all well together then flowr the Bagge or pot tye it up close and it will be boyled in an hours time[.]

for the sauce take a litle rose water and sugar a litle vinegar and butter beat together poure it upon it then serve it in this is esteemed a good puding[.]”

-John Evelyn, Cook. C.Driver, ed. Prospect Books, 1997. p. 143.

For the Pudding, sans pennyroyal….

6 eggs, beaten

1 cup cream

nutmeg, sugar, salt

parsley and caledula flowers (not French marigolds, which taste as nasty as they smell – look them up…)

a little wine (a sack is not a bag, although sack in a bag pudding sounds like the punchline of a 17th century riddle)

suet and grated bread, I mean Bread Crumbs.

This is one pudding that can be boiled in a bag or a basin – basin being a category the I hadn’t noticed in Robert May. hmmmm.

The rosewater, beaten butter and vinegar sauce sounds very very very nice indeed. Not too much rosewater or it will taste like the soaps your Nana put out for company smells.

 

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