Tagged ‘indian pudding’

National Indian Pudding Day

November 13th, 2013 by KM Wall

Sampe Fest wasn’t just about Jonnycakes….

It was also about Indian Pudding. Or as it was sometimes referred to:

Indian-meal Pudding

Samp Fest 2013

Samp Fest 2013

Big Batch Indian Pudding

3 Quarts milk

2 cups cornmeal (Plimoth Grist Mill cornmeal is the best!)

1 jar (12 ounces) molasses (non-sulphered or mild)

1 stick butter (1/4 pound)

6 eggs

4 teaspoons cinnamon

2 tsp ginger

 

 

Butter a large slow cooker and pre-heat on high.

Use a large heavy bottomed pan on the stove (so the milk doesn’t scorch). The milk will rise up when it heats, so give it plenty of room. When the milk is just under a boil (lots of bubbles forming), whisk in the cornmeal; keep stirring until the cornmeal thickens about 10-15 minutes. Add the rest of the butter, turn off the heat and cover the pan.

Beat the eggs with the molasses and the spices.

Add some of the hot corn/milk mixture to temper the eggs and then add that to the rest of the corn mixture. Blend thoroughly. Scrape into the buttered, pre-heat slow cooker.

Cook on low for 6-8 hours.

Serve with vanilla ice cream, whipped cream or light cream…..

 

Options:

Raisins, cranberries or chopped apples may be added into the slow cooker, either a little or a lot.

There’s a real divide with the fruit people – they love it or hate it!

 

It’s also good re-heated for breakfast.

 Cinnamon whipped cream is also pretty heavenly….

plimoth grist mill prodcut

 

 

 

National Indian Pudding Day

November 12th, 2012 by KM Wall

It’s that time again… Check out our Indian Pudding recipe in  Yankee Magazine!

There’s also a brand-new video that Comcast Get Local is airing on the Get Local station! We will post it when we get our very own copy. Until then, make sure you check your Get Local Comcast listings to see it!

I is for Indian Pudding….

September 28th, 2012 by KM Wall

…in the A-Z Guide in the current issue of Yankee Magazine.

And where do they recommend the Indian Pudding Day? The Patuxet Cafe at Plimoth Plantation! Check it out in Yankee Magazine

 

 

Eat Like A Pilgrim: Bill of Fare

April 17th, 2012 by KM Wall

and a few other notes…….

There are no forks, just spoons and knives and fingers – be sure to wash you hands before the start of the meal!

Napkins are a good size and belong in your lap, or for the men if they so choose, over the left shoulder.

The table has a tablecloth, because eating off of bare wood is for hogs at a trough.

Salt and bread are placed on first – they are the least hospitality. They will also be the last things removed.
This bread is known as cheate bread. It is made from wheat that hasn’t been sifted; that is, whole wheat flour. In the 17th century there is also white bread (sifted flour) and brown bread (sometimes dried pease or dried beans were ground and added to the unsifted flour). Cheate is the common household bread. In New England cornmeal is added as well as wheat.

A platter of grapes, prunes (dried plums) and cheese are set to daintily eat while conversing.

A sallet of cucumbers is a salad made from cucumbers, vinegar, oil, salt, pepper and a little sugar. Salads are more like condiments then side dishes in the 17th century; they add flavor and variety to the meal.

The commonest drink in early New England is water. The Wampanoag name for Plymouth is Patuxet, meaning place of many springs.

Turkey is served with a sauce of onions and breadcrumbs. (Sauce for Turkie)

Squash is served stewed (Stewed Pompion).

Indian Pudding is called that because it uses Indian, or corn meal. (Indian Pudding)

XXX

Happy National Indian Pudding Day!

November 13th, 2011 by Carolyn

Indian Pudding is a New England regional dish, which we do not see in a written form until 1796, but there is information that the dish was popular in New England long before it appears in cookbooks. This version of Indian Pudding, by Kathleen Wall, contains two staple ingredients found in New England – cornmeal and molasses, which was often baked or boiled for hours. No worries though, this recipe uses a slow cooker instead.

 

 

Indian-Meal Pudding

Ingredients:

3 cups milk

1/2 cup cornmeal

1/2 tsp salt

2+ tbl butter

2 eggs

1/3 cup molasses

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp ginger

Optional: 1/2 cup dried cranberries

 

Butter the inside of slow cooker and preheat on high for 15 minutes.

 

 

Whisk milk, cornmeal, and salt in a large heavy bottomed pan and bring to a  boil. (It will rise up somewhat as it heats, so give yourself lots of unless you like  cleaning up scorched milk off your stovetop.) After it comes to a boil, continue  whisking for another 5 minutes.

 

 

Cover and simmer on low for 10 minutes and then take off the burner. Add the butter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combine the eggs, molasses and spices. Take some of the hot cornmeal mixture and temper the egg mixture, combine both in to the pot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Stir in the cranberries as this point if you would like. You can also top this with  plastic wrap, cool and refrigerate for up to 24 hours, and then continue at this point.) Scrape final mixture into the buttered slow cooker and cook on high for  2-3 hours or on low for 6-8.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The finished pudding will be firm around the edges than the center. Serve warm with ice cream, whipped cream or light cream. Leftovers make a great breakfast.

Enjoy!

Indian Pudding- How 2 Heros

November 7th, 2011 by admin

Check out our video on How2Heros. Three ways to make Indian Pudding!

Indian Pudding

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