Tagged ‘geese’

Christmas Dinner

December 14th, 2012 by KM Wall

 

 

It was his own room. There was no doubt about that. But it had undergone a surprising transformation. The walls and ceiling were so hung with living green, that it looked a perfect grove; from every part of which, bright gleaming berries glistened. The crisp leaves of holly, mistletoe, and ivy reflected back the light, as if so many little mirrors had been scattered there; and such a mighty blaze went roaring up the chimney, as that dull petrification of a hearth had never known in Scrooge’s time, or Marley’s, or for many and many a winter season gone. Heaped up on the floor, to form a kind of throne, were turkeys, geese, game, poultry, brawn, great joints of meat, sucking-pigs, long wreaths of sausages, mince-pies, plum-puddings, barrels of oysters, red-hot chesnuts, cherry-cheeked apples, juicy oranges, luscious pears, immense twelfth-cakes, and seething bowls of punch, that made the chamber dim with their delicious steam. In easy state upon this couch, there sat a jolly Giant, glorious to see: who bore a glowing torch, in shape not unlike Plenty’s horn, and held it up, high up, to shed its light on Scrooge, as he came peeping round the door.

Charles Dickens. A Christmas Carol 1843

And, what, might you rightly ask, has Charles Dickens got to do with the Pilgrims?

Actually, Dickens is a Seasonings…..and will be performed Saturday night at Plimoth Plantation

Hope to see you there!

PS – My lines include the description of Christmas dinner, possibly the best lines in the play (alrighty – the best lines after ‘God Bless us, Every one’)  Thank-you, Jess.

 

I didn’t even know…

June 18th, 2012 by Carolyn

I’d never heard of Gooseberries until I started working at Plimoth Plantation, which horrified my co-workers, they responded like this…

 

 

and thankfully once they got over their initial shock they showed me these…

 

Gooseberries

In The Herbal, by John Gerard, in 1633, he writes:

“The ripe berries, as they are sweeter, … are very seldom eaten or used as a sauce.”

So for us this means we use them before they ripen, when they do they loose their tartness and become pink in color. He also writes:

“They are used in divers sauces for meat, as those that are skillful in cookerie can better tell than myself”

 

In translation he can’t cook, he just eats. Thankfully we have many cookery sources from the time period and are able to find gooseberries in all sorts of recipes. My favorites are hen cooked with gooseberry sauce, as well as gooseberry tart, both delicious in their own ways. Most recently we fired up the clome oven and baked ourselves a gooseberry tart using this recipe:

 

“Tartes of Gooseberries.

Lay your gooseberries in your crust, and put to them cinnamon and ginger, sugar and a few small raisins put among them and cover them with a cover.”

A Booke of Cookery with the Serving of the Table; A.W.; 1591; page 28

 

The result was this…

 

 

and a closer look…

 

 

We will all sorely miss the gooseberries once they are gone for the season, like all good things in life, like eggnog, but just like that eggnog the gooseberries will be back. And we will all be waiting…. with recipes.

To Roaste a Goose

March 6th, 2012 by Carolyn

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