Tagged ‘eggs’

National Indian Pudding Day

November 13th, 2013 by KM Wall

Sampe Fest wasn’t just about Jonnycakes….

It was also about Indian Pudding. Or as it was sometimes referred to:

Indian-meal Pudding

Samp Fest 2013

Samp Fest 2013

Big Batch Indian Pudding

3 Quarts milk

2 cups cornmeal (Plimoth Grist Mill cornmeal is the best!)

1 jar (12 ounces) molasses (non-sulphered or mild)

1 stick butter (1/4 pound)

6 eggs

4 teaspoons cinnamon

2 tsp ginger

 

 

Butter a large slow cooker and pre-heat on high.

Use a large heavy bottomed pan on the stove (so the milk doesn’t scorch). The milk will rise up when it heats, so give it plenty of room. When the milk is just under a boil (lots of bubbles forming), whisk in the cornmeal; keep stirring until the cornmeal thickens about 10-15 minutes. Add the rest of the butter, turn off the heat and cover the pan.

Beat the eggs with the molasses and the spices.

Add some of the hot corn/milk mixture to temper the eggs and then add that to the rest of the corn mixture. Blend thoroughly. Scrape into the buttered, pre-heat slow cooker.

Cook on low for 6-8 hours.

Serve with vanilla ice cream, whipped cream or light cream…..

 

Options:

Raisins, cranberries or chopped apples may be added into the slow cooker, either a little or a lot.

There’s a real divide with the fruit people – they love it or hate it!

 

It’s also good re-heated for breakfast.

 Cinnamon whipped cream is also pretty heavenly….

plimoth grist mill prodcut

 

 

 

Sallet Days, Plain and Simple.

October 26th, 2013 by KM Wall

If it’s Saturday, it must be Sallet -day….

Of Sallets, simple and plain
First then to speak of Sallets, there be some simple, some compounded, some only to furnish out the Table, and some both for use and adornation: your simple Sallets are Chibols pilled, washt clean, and half of the green tops cut clean away, and so served on a fruit dish, or Chives, Scallions, Rhaddish roots, boyled Carrets, Skirrets and Turnips, with such like served up simply: Also, all young Lettuce, Cabbage-Lettuce, Purslane, and divers other herbs which may be served simply without any thing but a little Vinegar, Sallet Oyl and Sugar; Onions boyled; and stript from their rind, and served up with Vinegar, Oyl and Pepper, is a good simple Sallet; so is Camphire, Bean-cods, Sparagus, and Cucumbers, served in likewise with Oyl, Venegar and Pepper, with a world of others, too tedious to nominate.

The English Huswife
Containing the inward and outward Vertues which ought to be in a Compleat Woman…
A Work generally approved, and now the Ninth time much Augmented, Purged, and made most profitable and necessary for all men, and the general good of this NATION.
By G. Markham.
LONDON, Printed for Hannah Sawbridge, at the Sign of the Bible on Ludgate Hill, 1683

  • A simple salad is one main thing, with what we now call dressing. A compound  salad had several different elements. A tossed Garden Salad is a modern example of a compound salad construction. A modern Potato Salad is a simple salad, even if it has hard boiled eggs in it, maybe even especially so.
  • for use or adoration means  – they’re for eating or for looking at – we’re just concerned with the eating ones
  • Chibols are a green onion, scallions and chives, are oniony as well, and, like radishes, are often served right at hand

    Annibale Carracci - The Bean eater

    Annibale Carracci – The Bean eater – notice the green onions by his hand – no plate, not a dish – a spoonful of beans and a bite of oniony goodness.

  • Boil your carrots, turnips and skirrets before eating them (or not, maybe having some by the side of your plate to eat a spoonful of beans and then a crunch of carrot)…..but if you have skirrets, they really are better off cooked before eating

    Turnips lurking in a Pilgrim Village garden - ready for a salad

    Turnips lurking in a Pilgrim Village garden – ready for a salad

  • Assorted little leafy green things served with oil, vinegar and salt….Cabbage-lettuce is headed lettuce, as apposed to loose leaves.
  •   Olive oil, wine or cider vinegar and, well, salt. There’s also ‘sallet oil’ in the 17th century. It’s made from rapeseed; rapes being part of the turnip family. We now call that oil canola oil….
    Rapeseed flowers

    Rapeseed flowers

    Canola seeds

    Canola seeds

 

 

 

  • Onions, boiled, bean cods (what we call ‘green beans’ ) boild; Asparagus (not at this time of year, unless you’re living in Australia) and of, course, cucumbers, are all good with oil vinegar, salt and pepper. Perhaps a pinch of sugar. When in doubt, boil. These days, we’re more likely to try raw, but the 17th century thinking was that cooking improved things for mans body by making it more artificial. Artificial was GOOD, because the hand of man was there. Raw was how the horse and cows ate the garden, and they were looking for a little emotional distance from the barnyard animals.
  • Boil, oil; boil, oil; boil, oil.
  • Simple simple simple simple
A Gentleman buys a Turnip

A Gentleman Buys a Turnip – except they look like radishes and he’s a little skeevy. I think he’s looking for more then salad fixin’s…

 

 

Jean-Baptiste Chardin - The Turnip Cleaner - 1738 - it's a little later, and a little French, but I'm pretty sure she's about to make some turnip sallett

Jean-Baptiste Chardin – The Turnip Cleaner – 1738 – it’s a little later, and a little French, but I’m pretty sure she’s about to make some turnip sallet

Lagniappe

October 15th, 2013 by KM Wall

something a little extra re: Italian Puddings…..

Richard Sax

Richard Sax

All the while, while  dipping in Italian  Pudding I  kept  thinking I was smelling  chocolate. Serious chocolate.

There is no chocolate mentioned in ANY of the 17th century English cookbooks I was searching through  AT ALL …..and then I remembered.

In Richard Sax’s Classic Home Desserts – which is a totally great cookbook, with wonderful recipes, great photos and stories and histories – there is an Italian Bread Pudding.

It is baked (or bakte).

The bread is cut into cubes. (Are you getting chills yet?)

In with the eggs and cream, there is also  chocolate.

Taste and memory, working together again.

Classic Home Dessert - Richard Sax

Classic Home Desserts – Richard Sax

Budino Nero (Italian Chocolate Bread Pudding)

First published in 1994, the book is still in print, so to avoid copyright issues, let me tell you that basically it’s the same Italian Pudding that John Murrell and W.I make, with equal amounts of semi-sweet chocolate and cubed bread by weight. That is, 3 ounces of bread (which is about 4 cups cubed) should have 3 ounces of chopped semi-sweet chocolate . Melt the chocolate in the cream or milk, before beating in the eggs (let it cool a little, don’t be impatient) and then gently add the cubed bread. Put it into a greased dish, bake  – not too hot, at 350° for about 1/2 an hour – don’t bake it too long – it should be a little wobbly, but it will firm up as it cools. You can add some sugar in, or wait to scrape – or sprinkle  -some on top.

Cacao - from John Gerard, The Herbal

Cacao – and other odd bobs of things – from Johnson on Gerard,The Herbal, 1633.

Chocolate in early 17th century had some PR issues. The name – Cacao -say it aloud, you know what it means, – means, well, sh_t in Spanish, and the same for Englishmen. I believe it was the Dutch who changed it to “Cocao”. What a difference one little letter makes. The rest is, as we say, HISTORY.

A giant Budina Nero – made in the large size Pyrex bowl was

The big one - and it was also a green one

The big one – and it was also a green one

 the BEST Birthday Cake EVER.

For the life of me I can’t remember which birthday, but it probably ended with a zero or a five….and the pudding was made by assorted Foodways deities  was a surprise and a delight. And a taste memory extraordinaire.

 

Italian Pudding bakte

October 14th, 2013 by KM Wall

It IS Columbus Day, after all. And although there is Italian bisket to consider, and how or how not, it is different from Naples bisket…..

Coat of Arms the House of Colon (that would be Christopher Columbus)

Coat of Arms the House of Colon (that would be Christopher Columbus, his house)

As I was looking at baked goods, and baked pudding in particular, I found not one, not two, but  THREE Italian puddings.

  1. They are all baked (or bakte – say it as it is spelled….now you’re talking like Shakespeare!)
  2. They all have bread cut into a dice, like a die, the little thing you toss in games of chance.
  3. Two of the three are from the same author – John Murrell – in different cookbooks  BUT they’re not exactly the  same. No cut and paste from John Murrell. I thought there were three from John Murrell, but the New Book of Cookerie and Book 1 of Two Books of Cookerie and Carving are the same book.  Three citations, two recipes.

All three, in chronological order:

To make an Italian Pudding

Take a Penny white Loafe, pare off the crust, and cut it in square pieces like unto great Dyes, mince a pound of Beefe Suite small: take halfe a pound of Razins of the Sunne, stone them and mingle them together with, and season them with Sugar, Rosewater, and Nutmegge, wet these things in foure Egges, and stirre them very tenderly for breaking the Bread: then put it into a Dish, and pricke three or foure pieces of  Marrow, and some sliced Dates: put it into an Oven hot enough for a Chewet: if your Oven be too hot, it will burne: if too colde, it will be heavy: when it is bakte scrape on Sugar, and serve it hot at Dinner, but not at Supper.

1615. John Murrell. A Newe Booke of Cookerie. Falconwood Press: 1989. p. 22.

This is the one you’ve seen before here  in If your Oven be too hot….(Sept 15, 2013)

And now John Murrell’s second Italian Pudding:

A bakte Pudding after the Italian fashion.

Pare off the crusts from a penny white loafe, cut it in square peeces like dice, put to it halfe a pounds of dubbing suet minct small, halfe a pound of Raisins of the Sunne, the stones taken out, two ounces of Suger, five or sixe sliced Dates, a graine of Muske, five or sixe lumps of Marrow : season these with Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and Salt, but a very little Salt is sufficient, beate a couple of Egges, with foure or five spoonefuls of Creame, power it upon your seasoned bread, and stirre very  gentley for breaking, so as the peeces may be wet, but not so wet that you can see any moisture in them: lay a Pomewater in the bottome of the Dish, or some sort of soft Apple pared, and sliced thinne, put your Pudding also upon the Apple, and so set the Dish into an Oven, as hot as for Manchet, or small Pies, when you see it rise yellow take downe your Oven lidde to coole your Oven, it will be bakte in half an houre: if the Oven be too hot, it will be burnt, if it be too cold, it will be too heavy, when it is bakte draw it forth, and scrape on Sugar, and serve it hot to the Table.

- 1638. John Murrell. The Second Book of Cookerie. Fifth Impression. Stuart Press: 1993. p. 25.

Square pieces of bread – check. Dubbing suet?? – I’m coming up cold; Muske – this is taking it up a notch; Cream as well as eggs – makes this richer; taking down tour oven lidde to cool the oven – nice detail! This is how you control the heat in a woodfired oven. The same advice about too cold and too hot, making me think this is a real Goldilocks moment.

Once again, you are asked to stone the raisins. Thank you Sun Maid for drying seedless raisins, so we don’t have to do that anymore!

130px-Sun-Maid_1916The Pomewater is a type of apple – nice of him to mention that any soft apple will do.

A few of the many Apples in Gerard's Herbal

A few of the many apples in Gerard’s Herbal

The third Italian Pudding comes from someone else, a little later…..

To make an Italian Pudding.

Take a manchet, and cut it into square pieces like a Die, then put to it half a pound of beef suet minced small, Raisins of the Sun the stones picked out, Cloves, Mace, minced, Dates, Sugar, Marrow, Rose-water, Eggs, and Cream, mingle all these together, and put them into a dish fir for your stuffe, in less then an hour it will be baked, then scrape on Sugar, and serve it.

- 1653. W.I. A True Gentlewomans Delight. Falconwood Press: 1991. p. 45.

 

 

 

A little more french bisket

October 13th, 2013 by KM Wall

Are these more biskets or are these more french?

La Varrene

La Varrene – The (original) French Chef!

La Varenne  brought his cookbook out in 1651. By 1653 it had been ‘Englished”  and was for sale in London.

He also has a recipe for bisket. Two, in fact. If it’s in a French cookbook does that make it a French biscuit even if they don’t call it that?

How to make bisket.

Take eight eggs, one pound of sugar into powder, with three quarters of a pound of flowre. Mix all together and thus it will be neither too soft nor too hard.

- 1653. Francois Pierre La Varenne. Englished by L.D.G The French Cook.  intro by Philip and Mary Hyman. Southover Press: 2001. p.240.

These are more like the just plain bisket – or English bisket – then the french bisket. Notice how they don’t get boiled first. Note also that although La Varenne is considered THE man to talk about when talking about modernized (as opposed to medieval), codified French cuisine, there are still lovely vaguenesses as “thus it will be neither too soft nor too hard”. Maybe that’s just the translator talking.

The very last recipe in the book is another bisket.

How to make bisket of Savoy.

Take six yolks and eight whites [of] eggs, with one pound of sugar in powder, three quarters of a pound of good flower made of good wheat, and some aniseed, beaten all well together; and boile it. Make a paste neither too soft nor too hard, if it is too soft, you may mix with it some flowre of sugar for to harden it. When it is well proportioned , put it into moules of white tinne made for the purpose and then bake them half in the oven. When they are half baked, take them out, and moisten them at the top with the yolks of eggs ; after that, put them in the oven again for to make an end of baking. When they are so baked that they are not too much burned, nor too soft, take them out, and set them in a place which is neither too cool nor too dry.

1653. Francois Pierre La Varenne. Englished by L.D.G The French Cook.  intro by Philip and Mary Hyman. Southover Press: 2001. p. 246.

The little tin molds fascinate me, in part because it’s about 100 years earlier then I thought I’d ever see them. I should have been paying more attention to sweetmeats! The end-note of a place “neither too cool nor too dry”……is almost as good as “not too much burned, nor too soft”.

Savoy can be one of several things.

Savoy palace - drawing of 1650

Savoy palace – drawing of 1650

Savoy Record Company NOT the savoy of the 17th century bisket!

Savoy Record Company NOT the savoy of the 17th century bisket!

 

 

Arnotts Biscuit  - they carry a Savoy biscuit in the 20th century

Arnotts Biscuit – they carry a Savoy biscuit in the 20th century

The modern day Savoy biscuit is a cracker sold in parts of Australia. It’s by the same company that makes Tim-Tams. Among others.

Tim-Tams....mmmm

Tim-Tams….mmmm

There’s still Prince bisket and Italian bisket, and a more careful look at bisket bread ahead in the bisket trail.

Why did we change the spelling of bisket? Why don’t we change it back?

 

 

 

 

french Biskets

October 12th, 2013 by KM Wall

To continue with biskets…..no less an authority then the late Alan Davidson in The Oxford Companion to Food states that biscuit  means  different things to  different people, in the past as well as the present,  from the UK/USA what means biscuit now (the one to dunk in your tea, the other to put under your gravy) and then the whole sea bisket/ship’s biscuit/hardtack sidebar…..and of course, there’s MORE

The Oxford Companion to Food - the update paperback version is called the Penguin Companion to Food - if you're serious about food history, you need one of these nearby.

The Oxford Companion to Food – the updated paperback version is called the Penguin Companion to Food – if you’re serious about food history, you need one of these nearby.And there are beets on this cover….you know how much beets mean to me….

Back to England, back to some 17th century recipes……

I’ve found only one bisket recipe that’s named English bisket. More common are French bisket recipes , and also those for bisket bread, bisket bread which is sometimes also called French bisket. But not always.

But of course.

French Bakers banner

Probably loaves of bread on these peels, but it’s the right shape so it could be French biscuit.

 

To make French Biskets.

Take two pounds of fine flower, being baked in an Ouen, take eight ounces of Suger baten and cersed, Coliander-seed, sweet Fennell-seede, and Caraway-seede, of these, each an ounce, worke all these up into a lythe paste with eight new layd egges and a little Rose-water, then roule it vp in a faire cloath like a pudding, as big as your Legge, and put it vp close and tye it fast at both ends, that no water get in, then put it into a Kettle of boyling water, letting it boyle two houres stirring it now and then that it burne not too, then take it vp and cut it in thicknesse of an ordinary trencher in round pieces, then lay it vpon a wyar lattice and sette it in a warme Ouen, and when it is drye that you may beat to a powder, then take a pound of double refined Sugar, and boyle it to a Candie height with as much Rose-water as will desolve it, then take your foresaid dry bisket and dip it in your hot Sugar, & lay it vpon your wyars againe, and set it in a warme ouen three or foure houres after the bread is drawn out, and within an houre turn it and when it is dry it will bee like candied all over, so box it and it will keepe all the yeare.

- 1621.John Murrell. A Delightful daily exercise for Ladies and Gentlewoman. Falconwood Press: 1990. p. 4.  

All that seedy goodness makes this seem an awful lot like English bisket, as well the insistence for new layd eggs and beaten  – I mean – baten  – and cersed sugar. Cersed is sifted.

The other Elizabeth Sieve Portrait - I'm assuming this isn't to show us her domestic side....but these are the sorts of sieves that you'd sift the beaten sugar through, the finest sieves being made of silk cloth, the courser one of horsehair.

The Elizabeth Sieve Portrait – I’m assuming this isn’t to show us her domestic side….but these are the sorts of sieves that you’d sift the beaten sugar through, the finest sieves being made of silk cloth, the courser ones of horsehair. This is most definitely NOT horsehair.

The tying up the batter in a cloth and boiling it in a kettle – shaped like a leg, which make me think of roly poly puddings, or at least the one in The Thornbirds, which is boiled in mother’s cotton stocking….

Novel and min-series...great food....

Novel and min-series…great food….

But I digress….

The two step boiled and then baked technique puts this French bisket in the same catagory as  some of the jumbles, simmels  and cracknels.  Pretzels also fall into this catagory.

An ordinary trencher....

An ordinary trencher….cut the pieces about this thick

The George Gower Elizabeth Sieve portrait

The George Gower Elizabeth Sieve portrait

 

 

 

 

English Bisket

October 11th, 2013 by KM Wall

All good things start at home, so let’s take a look at the international biskets of 17th century England, by looking at the one that is called

ENGLISH BISKET

btw, ‘BISKET” is by far and by large the most common spelling of the biscuit in the 17th century. In England. Results may vary by country.

 

 

To make English Bisket.

Take eight new layd egges, taking away the whites of foure of them, beate the eight yoalks and the other foure whites in a faire bowle the fourth parte of an houre, then take a pound of fine flower being dryed in an earthen pot closed covered : then take eight ounces of hard sugar beaten fine, and beat them into your egges with the end of a rowling pin, and beat it so very hard for the space of an houre, but by no meanes let it stand still, always beating it, then haue an Ouen as hot as for manchet ready cleane, hauing some saucers of flate plates, or little tine Coffins buttered over with a feather as thinne as you can strike it over, then put into yoru forsaid paste Coliander-seed, sweet Fennel seede, and Caroway seed, of each the fourth part of an ounce, when you have beaten these into your paste, put it into your saucers, and set them presently into the Ouen, and when you see it rise vp and look white, you may take down your lid, and in a quarter of an houre they will be made, then box it vp and keep it all the yeare.

1621. John Murrell. The Delightful daily exercise for Ladies and Gentlewomen. Falconwood Press: 1990. p. 3.

A whole lot of beating going on - these need to be light and frothy. If only they had a Kitchen-Aid.

A whole lot of beating going on – these need to be light and frothy. If only they had a Kitchen-Aid.

Coriander seed - we call the leafy part cilantro or even Chinese parsley

Coriander seed – we call the leafy part cilantro or even Chinese parsley

 

 

Fennel seed - all together this is going to have a very liquorice taste

Fennel seed – all together this is going to have a very liquorice taste

 

Our old friend caraway, up close,. You might remember him as Kimmel....

Our old friend caraway, up close. You might remember him as Kimmel….

Yet Another Manchet Monday

September 23rd, 2013 by KM Wall

Lady of Arundels manchet.

Take a bushel of fine Wheat-flower, twenty eggs, three pound of Fresh butter, then take as much Salt and Barme, as to the ordinary Manchet, temper it together with new Milk prettie hot, then let it lie the space of half an hour to rise, so you may work it up into bread, and bake it, let not your Oven be too hot.

- 1653. A True Gentlewomans Delight. W.I, Gent. London. (Falconwood Press:1991.(trans) p. 54

Very interesting bread.

  1.  Butter, milk and eggs make this a very different sort of manchet. This really falls into the sweetbreads category.
  2. And then there’s the Arundel family. Jjust who is Lady Arundel? What’s her  backstory?
Arundel Castle in West Sussex

Arundel Castle in West Sussex

The castle goes back to 1067….as does the earldom title.

The town of Arundel

The town of Arundel – you can see the castle up on the hill

The interesting  thing about the title is that succession issues get a little mired – in the 17th century, but of course!

22nd Earl of Arundel

22nd Earl of Arundel – Henry Howard

 

I think this might be the husband of the Lady the recipe came from. She was Lady Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of Esme Stuart,Third Duke of Lennox. There is no image of her that I could find. They marry in 1626 and have 9 children. BTW, there is a portrait or two of Henry Howard’s  godmother:

Anne of Denmark, also married to James I and VI, King of England and Scotland, &cetera

Anne of Denmark, also married to James I and VI, King of England and Scotland, & cetera

But this is one of things were timing is EVERYTHING. Henry Howard, 22nd Earl  of Arundel dies 17 April 1652. So, has our mysterious gentleman, W. I. already moved on to the next Lady Arundel or ….

The story of these offspring would make a GREAT mini-series for Masterpiece Theater, once they run through the Downton Abbey crew. Insanity, Roman Catholic Cardinals…..Really – you can’t make this stuff up.

AND

Lady Arundel’s Manchet has it’s own Wikipedia entry.

Which doesn’t include the recipe.

What the Wiki entry misses is how different from other period manchets this bread is. Which you already know. But also, how much this manchet is like 17th century English French Bread.

 

Just another Manchet Monday

September 16th, 2013 by KM Wall

Manchets are regulated by the Books of Assizes, which means the price is set, but the size varies according to the price of wheat.That is, when they are made and sold by members of the Baker’s Guild in bake shops.

But manchets are also are being made in individual households. Some of the recipes for manchets are attributed to specific ladies. So there is a range of what manchet can mean when it’s made  outside of the Bakers Shops.

The making of manchets after my Ladie Graies use.
Take two peckes of fine flower, which must be twise boulted, if you wil haue your manchet verie faire: The lay it in a place where you doe use to lay dowe for your bread, and make a litle hole in it, and take a quart of faire water blood warme, and put in that water as much leaven as a crab, or a pretie big apple, and as much white salt as will fill an Egshell, and all to breake your leuen in the water, and put into your flower halfe a pinte of good Ale yest, and so stir this liquor among a litle of your flower, so that you must make it but thin at the first meeting, and then cover it with flower, and if it be in the winter, ye must keepe it verie warm, and iin summer it shall not need so much heate, for in the Winter it will not rise without warmeth. Thus let it lie two howers and a halfe: then at the second opening take more liquor as ye thinke will serue to wet al the flower. Then put in a pinte and a halfe of good yest, and so all to breake it in short pieces, after yee have well laboured it, and wrought it fiue or sixe tymes, so that yee bee sure it is throughlie mingled together, so continue labouring it, till it come to a smooth paste, and be well ware at the second opening that yee put not in too much liquor sodenlie, for then it will run, and if ye take a litle it will be stiffe, and after the second working it must lie a good quarter of hower, and keep it warme: then take it up to the moulding board, and with as much speede as is possible to be made, mould it up, and set it into the Oven, of one pecke of flower ye may make ten caste of Manchets faire and good.”
- 1594. The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kichin. London fasc ed. pp. 51-2.

 

NOTES:

  • Great details in this version, especially of measurements
  • Two pecks is half a bushel – this is still making quite a bit of bread
  • Twice bolting – or sifting – would make the flour fair because more of the darker germ and husk would have been removed. The whiter the flour, the fairer the bread.
  • dowe = dough
  • leaven as much as a crab – which I believe in this case is a crab apple, because apple are the next measure.
  • European crabapples

    European crabapples

  • as much salt as will fill an egg shell – that’s still fairly salt-free compared to modern breads
  • Eggshell

    Eggshell

  • Notice that the leaven seems to be something somewhat solid (perhaps a piece of sourdough) and there is also ale-yeast,which has a liquid measure
  • The section about keeping it covered in Winter so it will rise make this sound like a 17th century ‘quick’ bread – you want a fast rising, no long slow rise – and therefore a very different flavour profile.
  • More yeast, and lots of kneading. This is going to make a firm crumb – none of this big, irregular holes of the modern artisan  – this is bread that has been touched – a lot – by human hands.
  • Biscuit brake

    Biscuit brake -another tool to help really,really knead your bread. Or you can have your apprentices tread the dough with their bare feet….

  • The moulding board is not a nasty, mildewy place, but rather where the loaves are moulded -or shaped . Lady Graie is have you go tout suit on this; no second rising, get them into shape and pop them into the oven.
  • I’m still unclear how the math works out for year. If one peck of flour  makes 10 caste of Manchets fair and good, the two pecks here should make 20 caste, so how many loaves in a caste?
  • More mysteries…
This is definitely a white bread...but is it a manchet - or whatever the Dutch equivalent would be

This is definitely a white bread…but is it a manchet ? – or whatever the Dutch equivalent would be – noticed how the loaf kissed the one beside it in the oven

 

If your Oven is too hot it will burn

September 15th, 2013 by KM Wall

That’ s the warning in John Murrell’s  Italian Bread Pudding. Although, the same is true of pretty much anything you put into the too hot oven. John Murrell has two other Italian Puddings throughout his works, all three of which are baked bread puddings. The Italian of this pudding is the fashion of the the making the pudding, not the bread that was used, although good Italian bread would work just fine…….to begin this recipe……

Take a Penny white Loafe

These might be penny white loaves....

These might be penny white loaves….the fat round ones

 

Or the loave might have been a little larger, like these

Or the loaves might have been a little larger, like these

Tsaid penny loafhis is the (silver) penny you'd need to buy

This is said  (silver) penny you’d need to buy the penny loaf

 

 

pare off the crust, and cut it in square pieces like unto great Dyes,

those would be large dice

Dice recovered at Jamestown

Dice recovered at Jamestown – enlarged to show detail

 

 

Simo Gomez - the Dice Players

Simo Gomez – the Dice Players – dice in context -  not so terribly large

To make an Italian Pudding

Take a Penny white Loafe, pare off the crust, and cut it in square pieces like unto great Dyes, mince a pound of Beefe Suite small: take halfe a pound of Razins of the Sunne, stone them and mingle them together with, and season them with Sugar, Rosewater, and Nutmegge, wet these things in foure Egges, and stirre them very tenderly for breaking the Bread: then put it into a Dish, and pricke three or foure pieces of  hoMarrow, and some sliced Dates: put it into an Oven hot enough for a Chewet: if your Oven be too hot, it will burne: if too colde, it will be heavy: when it is bakte scrape on Sugar, and serve it hot at Dinner, but not at Supper.

1615. John Murrell. A Newe Booke of Cookerie. Falconwood Press: 1989. p. 22.

 

I’m not entirely sure what the last line means – might it be served hot at Dinner, upper OR is it to be served hot at at Dinner, but not at Supper at all?

 

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