Pilgrim Seasonings

Plymouth Colony Foodways: Notes and Recipes from a 17th Century Kitchen

Making Whoopie (Pies)

September 1st, 2013 by KM Wall

Whoopie! But no whoopie pies in the 17th century.

A month of pies. No tarts, one cheesecake, and so much more that there just wasn’t room for.

Some people have stars in their eyes…lately I’ve had pies. Which would make me pie-eyed, if pie-eyed didn’t already mean something else.

My kind of pie-eyed

My kind of pie-eyed

About pie charts….

Playfair's piechart - the original

Playfair’s pie-chart – the original from 1801

Soon there will be pie-charts about pies:

  • Is ” to make a pie ” the same thing as “to bake a pie”?
  • What is the real and measurable difference between apple tarts and apple pies? Quince tarts and Quince pies? Or is it a subjective difference?
  • What about paste and pastry and coffins and lids?
  • How may kinds of  pastry are there?
  • Venison pies are their own category – to be served hot, to be served cold, of fallow deer, of roe deer, to be kept long, as well as Mutton to taste lie venison, and beef to taste like venison.  The roe and the faux.
  • Meat pies, mince pies, and we’ve only scratched the bits surface. Cockscombs, lambstones,  ox palates – all have pies, too.
  • Across the time access, how do pie shake out? Are there pies from 1588 that disappear before 1688? Do certain pies emerge as the 17th century moves on?
  • Lears and caudles and creams and other sauces to add to pie, speaking of shaking and shogging….what’s their story/backstory?
  • What are the obvious questions that I’m overlooking and should be asking?

Time to take a break from pies, stand back and get some perspective, let the pie dust settle, as it were.

September is harvest time and harvest means

Bread!

total transition recipes:

To make a tarte of bread.

Take grated bread, and put to it molten Butter, and a litle Rosewater and Sugar, and the yolkes of Egs, and put it into your paste, and bake, and when you serue it, cut it in foure quaters and cast sugar on it.

1591. A. W. A Book of Cookrye.

To make a tarte of bread.

Take grated bread, and put to it molten Butter, and a litle Rosewater and Sugar, and the yolkes of Egs, and put it into your paste, and bake, and when you serue it, cut it in foure quaters and cast sugar on it.

1594 Good Huswifes handmaide to the kitchen.

Entertaining Pie-Eyed

Entertaining Pie-Eyed

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2 Responses to “Making Whoopie (Pies)”

  1. carolina says:

    Hmmm, looks like someone stole, er, “borrowed” another cookbook author’s receipt! Either that, or perhaps both books were written by the same person? Interesting!

    • KM Wall says:

      The AW and the Good Huswife have a core of recipes that are either identical or extremely close; then they each have a group of receipts that are variations on the English early modern cookbook theme; and THEN they each have a cluster of unique to them and found no where else. I agree that that there might be a common someone involved in the two sources.

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