Mayflower II Captain's Blog

Life aboard a 17th Century reproduction ship

On The Move

July 22nd, 2013 by Peter Arenstam
Lifting the Bowsprit from its winter home next to the shop building.

Lifting the Bowsprit from its winter home next to the shop building.

Things are moving in the shipyard these days. And by moving I mean up in the air. Today the crane was back to help us put the pieces of Mayflower II that have been missing for a while back in their rightful place.

Three dimensional pattern of the a section  of the bowsprit.

Three dimensional pattern of  a section of the bowsprit.

To prepare for the reinstallation of the bowsprit we made a pattern that reperesents the section of the bow sprit that runs down from the beakhead deck to the lower deck. Making the pattern was supposed to make it easier to install the bowsprit. The new deck work includes the supporting structure for the bowsprit.

Space through which the bowsprit must fit.

Space through which the bowsprit must fit.

 

So the pattern helped, somewhat. It turns out the tolerances between the bottom of the deck beam and the top of the deck blocking is pretty darn close. The crane operator was very patient. He is paid by the hour so I can understand one reason for his patiences.

About four hours after we started the bowsprit was in place.

 

Bowsprit no longer on the move.

Bowsprit no longer on the move.

Next up today was the rudder. The scale on the crane said it weighs in at 3,500 lbs.

New rudder on an old ship.

New rudder on an old ship.

Funny thing, the crane operator is the man standing at the back of the rudder, holding on to it with one hand. He has a remote control box for the crane, which comes in handy when you can’t see what you are picking up from the crane itself.

Fitting the rudder to the old hardware.

Fitting the rudder to the old hardware.

Some of the rudder pins, called pintles were worn and had to be replaced. Again, like the bowsprit and the deck beams,  there is very close tolerance between the pintles and the gudgeons. (Gudgeons are the straps on the stern post through which the pintles must fit.) I won’t say the rudder took as long to fit as the bowsprit but I will say it don’t go in on the first try. Have I mentioned that we are doing the beakhead deck repair and Tony and his shipyard crew built the new rudder? Some how they finished just as the whistle for the end of the day went off.

Main mast cap going aloft.

Main mast cap going aloft.

We had to make new mast caps this winter in our shop for both the main and fore masts. They are made out of angelique and they are heavy. We used to haul the old ones up the mast with a block and tackle. I was very happy to let the crane operator do the lifting for us this time. I wasn’t so happy to have to climb up to the main mast working top to fit the cap in place. It was late, I was tired.

 

 

 

2 Responses to “On The Move”

  1. NORMA RICCI says:

    what a fantastic job ! thank you for all your hard work ! and time ! to save our history !

  2. Hal Johnson says:

    Will the Mayflower be back in Plymouth this year?

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