Mayflower II Captain's Blog

Life aboard a 17th Century reproduction ship

Bottoms Up

September 12th, 2007 by Peter Arenstam

We reached a turning point in the project today. We flipped the boat upright, so that for the first time it resembles what a boat looks like in the water.

The process, like lots of things we do, required a fair amount of worry and very little trouble. We talked through various ways of lifting the boat, supporting the boast, protecting the boat and in the end decided to flip the boat in as simple a way as possible.

We used a pair of handy billies, or block and tackle to lift one edge of the boat. We reinforced the lower corner on which the boat would rotate and set up some old tires covered with canvas to receive the boat as it settled in the upright position.

Here is some of the backlog of pictures. George Greenmeyer, a very talented volunteer is carving the name boards for the boat. Appropriately the boat will be named volunteer.

The other picture was from last Friday. During our class we put the waterline on the boat. This is a good thing to do while the boat is still set up level and horizontal on the building jig. The process, partial illustrated in the picture is to set up level straightedges at each end of the boat at the height of the waterline.

An individual sights from one straight edge to the other viewing the plane that is created between them A second individual hold a pencil on the hull and slides it up into the view of the other person. They make a mark on the hull when the pencil point crosses the plane the first person is sighting.

They repeat the process every 8” or so along the hull, connect all those points with a batten and there you have it, one straight accurately applied waterline.

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